Tag Archives: security

So you’re confused about the gandi.cli API keys?

Yeah, me too.

The Gandi cli looks great on paper, however, it’s a bit unfriendly to get running,

Here is the situation, as of September 2019:

  • you actually need two different API keys
  • the old V4 interface uses a XMLRPC API.
  • the new V5 interface uses a REST API

So you need to go to v4.gandi.net, log in with your handle, and in your account management go to the API management and (re)generate your (XMPRPC) API key.

Then you also need to go to gandi.net, log in with your username, and in your security settings (re)generate a (REST) API key.

Finally, when running `gandi setup` you will put the v4 key first and the v5 key last.

This will give you a config file $HOME/.config/gandi/config.yaml that will look something like this:

api:
host: https://rpc.gandi.net/xmlrpc/
key: ikaitooquu4ahfun5Gidaen
apirest:
key: ien5quun1Eezaer3iesh7ph

I get a “IOError: unsupported XML-RPC protocol” error when trying to use the gandi record command.

But using the gandi dns command works fine.

record is the command to manage old (v4) domains .

dns is the command to manage “LiveDNS” (v5) domains.

Enabling a U2F security key on Github with Firefox (even if Github tries to stop you)

So, there’s this cool thing called U2F, for Universal 2nd Factor, a dead simple second authentication method in the form of a physical token (I’m using a Yubikey Neo, but that’s not specially relevant to we’ll be talking about here as it should apply to any security key).

By Tony Webster from Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States – Hardware Authentication Security Keys (Yubico Yubikey 4 and Feitian MultiPass FIDO), CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=71716914

To put in simpler term: with U2F to log in to a website you need the password and a physical doodad plugged in the computer. No doodad, no access. Sorry evildoers.

The idea being that while it’s possible to steal credentials (login and password), if you need also a physical thing, then just the credentials on their own are not useful.

With “we run a super advanced global scale Internet infrastructure” Facebook storing hundreds of millions of credentials in the clear (good job Facebook, really), it makes sense to use something that can’t just be stolen over the Internet.

I mean, you wouldn’t download a car, right?

So enabling U2F wherever you can is a good idea (as is having multiple physical security keys, as you will lose one or have it stolen).

Just show me how and stop blabbering

Fair enough. Let’s look at how to enable U2F security keys on Github in April 2019.

First of all, you’ll need to go to your Github account’s security settings and enable Two Factor Authentication (or 2FA as we cool kids call it, yo.). Github currently forces you to enable another 2FA method first, either SMS (erk) or TOTP (yes), so you’ll have to do that first. (Hint: you can use decent, FOSS apps to do TOTP on your phone).

Unfortunately for us, U2F is not enabled by default in current versions of Firefox (66.0.1 as i write this).

Luckily, it’s very simple to enable however, visiting `about:config`, searching for “U2F” and toggling “Security.webauth.U2F” to “true” is enough.

More disheartening is the fact that even with this setting enabled, Github won’t let you add a key to your account, insisting instead that you “update to the latest version of Google Chrome”.

Not going to do that.

Instead, you can simply use Firefox’s developer tools to unhide the button that lets you add a security key.

To do so, open the Developer Tools (hitting F12 will do nicely) and in the Inspector, search html for “new-u2f-registration”. You should find a div element with a CSS display set to “none”, as shown in the CSS viewer (located to the bottom or to the right of the main inspector pane, depending on if your dev tools ar docked to the right or to the right, respectively).
Then, just untick the box next too “display: none;” and the “Register new device” button will appear.

The following screenshot might help:

Unhiding the Register new device button using Firefox’s Dev Tools

After that, everything works as you’d expect: you click the button, plug your key in, touch its button if it has one, give it a name to recognise with on Github, and you’re done.

Good, one less website to authenticate to without 2FA.

Adding a ED25519 SSH key to an ubiquiti edgemax router

Contrary to what I thought¹, it is possible to use an elliptic curve-based public SSH key on a Edgemax router, runnning a (recent?) EdgeOS.

Connect to the router over SSH and issue the following, to add your key to EdgeOS’s (/Vyatta’s) configuration:

configure
set system login user $your_router_user authentication public-keys user@host key "KEY-BODY-HERE"
set system login user $your_router_user authentication public-keys user@host type ssh-ed25519
commit
save

A few things to note:

  • user@host is whatever you want, it’s just the way one describes the key (technically, the config tree entry)
  • you’ll probably want to use YourUser@YourHost, YourHost as in: the host you are connecting from. That’s what is normally generated by OpenSSH as a comment at the end of public keys but…
  • …EdgeOS doesn’t understand any comment at the end of public SSH keyfiles. Even if they are a standard feature of OpenSSH keys.
  • In fact, it doesn’t recognise anything before the key itself either, so the usual ssh-rsa or ssh-ed25519 at the beginning of a keyfile make it choke.
  • So you must put nothing but the key body, in between quotes, when setting the config value system login user $your_router_user key
  • Finally, as you have probably guessed from the previous bullet points, setting the system login user $your_router_user type to ed_25519 is you tell EdgeOS what kind of key this is. Yes, this is the part that is at the beginning of a normal SSH keyfile.

This also explains why one hits the following error, when trying to paste when pasting the whole keyfile in the set system login etc. command.

Invalid public key character not base-64

Unfortunately, I was hoping that would explain why the loadkey command doesn’t accept the key from the keyfile, but… no. Even if you strip your public key file of the opening key type declaration (such as ssh-ed25519) and the ending comment (such as axel@master-switch), loadkey still complains and I get a:

Not a valid key file format (see man sshd) at /opt/vyatta/sbin/vyatta-load-user-key.pl line 96, <$in> line 1

Oh well.

  1. It’s not like EdgeOS’s public SSH key management is super user friendly.